kceyagi:

The Writers Lab in Skyros, Greece

Choose your writing genre then choose your week from June to September every year and be guided by award-winning published authors in a classic Greek Island setting for three hours a day.  Add daily gentle yoga, time for wandering the ancient island, personal writing time and beach time.

Iceland Writers’ Retreat, Iceland

Fancy being led by Orange Prize for Fiction winner Barbara Kingsolver, Man Booker Prize nominee Alison Pick or New Yorker staffer Adam Gopnik? They’re just three of the 10 prestigious writers who will guide small groups of writers over four days in Reykjavik from April 8 to 12 in 2015.  Each registered retreat writer partakes in six small group writing workshops, an active social interaction program, local tours and daily time to write.

The Faber Academy at Allen and Unwin, Sydney

A mere 15 would-be fiction writers will descend upon the HQ of Allen and Unwin publishers from October 20 to 24 this year for tutelage from Orange Prize nominated Kathryn Heymon, author of five novels.  Guest tutor during the week is Ross Grayons Bell, who was the creative producer and adaptor of the cult film Fight Club.  $1100 will get you one of these sought-after seats and includes daily morning and afternoon tea, lunch, two workshops a day and writing time.

Literary Adventures, Spain

London’s The Literary Consultancy offers writing holidays in Spain each Northern autumn and spring in a four century old Spanish casa in the Alpujarras mountains. The week is capped at 12 participants who are overseen by published author and journalist Rebecca Adams with Rebecca Swift, the founder of The Literary Consultancy. The five-day writing adventure covers accommodation and board for £695 ($1223).

Paris Writers’ Retreat, France

Spend time with New York Times bestselling authors and literary agents in romantic Paris. The Rohm Agency offers two retreats a year in the French capital with the likes of Pulitzer nominated Suketa Mehta and screenwriter Pan Nalin, and New York agent Sterling Lord.  The intensive course costs $US1995 ($2133) and does not include accommodation.

Arvon Residential Writing Retreats, UK

Arvon has four rural writing houses in Devon, Inverness-Shire, Shropshire and Yorkshire in the UK. Fifteen writers and two tutors write, cook and eat together while staying in one of these homes.  Mornings are spent in workshop and afternoons in tutorial and writing time. Courses offered revolve around fiction, non-fiction, writing for screen and life writing, and are run by established and esteemed published writers. £700 ($1232) will get you a room in the house, meals and the course for the week.

Australian Writers Centre overseas writing tours

Fancy a writers’ week with fellow Australians in an exotic location? Choose from Vietnam, Bali, Paris and Oxford and explore the author within.  From food writing to life writing to fiction, you will be guided by respected published writers in emotive settings designed to get the creative juices flowing.

Memoir Writing Retreat, Dartbrook, New York

Work with renowned author Abigail Thomas on the story of your life over five intensive days with an intimate group of eight in the Adirondack High Peaks of New York State. A chef provides local produce-inspired meals, Abigail gives both one-on-one and group tutelage, and daily writing is required. The cost is $US2295 ($A2454).

Vancouver School of Writing in Mexico

Two separate weeks are offered in January and February near Manzanillo in Mexico led by writing coach and author of Writing With Cold Feet and the A to Zen of Writing, Kathrin Lake. For $C507 ($499) you will receive group writing classes, one-on-one coaching and a social program. Accommodation is extra.

The Writers Journey around the world

Jan Cornall specializes in ‘meditative writing’ and has retreats in Burma, Fiji, Morocco, Bali, Vietnam and Thailand. Join Cornall in March in Fiji for the Fiji Island Writers Lab and a Breakthrough Writing Retreat, or head to the Irawaddy Writers Festival and a week retreat in Bagan in Burma in February.

Reblog - 2 days ago via writingwithcolor · © kceyagi with 331 notes
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Clearly, there’s more to the lack of diversity in children’s books than whether or not POC are creating and publishing them. Could it be that some lack the motivation to seek out the books that are already there? That’s what René Saldaña, Jr., is asking. Now, I am, too.

Mind you, I’m not saying that we don’t need more books by people of color, because we most certainly do. The numbers show that we are woefully off the mark in producing diverse books in numbers commensurate with the proportion of our ever-increasingly diverse population. But that said, I am suggesting that we, perhaps, look at the issue a little more closely, that we ask a few more uncomfortable, but necessary, questions.

"

Mister Cellophane by Nikki Grimes

(via richincolor)

Reblog - 2 days ago via weneeddiversebooks · © tubooks with 77 notes
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Friends and foes (and writer’s woes), we’re working on a few larger projects. One of them is really exciting, but we need to know who’d be interested. 

We want to put together an Anthology of Writing and Artwork. Meaning, we want to take the poems, stories, and comics that people send us and make them available in print and as an ebook. That way, we can give the new and young writers who ask us for advice what might be their first chance to get published — and they can share it (in whichever form) with whoever they want! 

The book would feature your writing and comics, mixed in with articles about writing skills and interviews with writers and creators we think you’ll appreciate. 

So here’s what we need to know: are our followers interested? We know you like contests, but do you want your short fiction or poem to be published by us and shared with other writers learning just like you? Tell us with a like (and a signal boost) or a message if you’re interested either in submitting to a CH anthology, or reading one. We want to know! 


What I often see in NA books, tho, is basically YA porn, or close to it. Do you think this category is helpful for a self-pubbed book that doesn’t have sex and isn’t about sex?

I think labels are what we make of them, and that the NA category (while maybe influenced by marketing) isn’t any different. While New Adult books will naturally have more sexual content overall than Young Adult, sexual content has been a staple of many coming of age novels for a long time.

That doesn’t mean all YA novels feature sex, so I don’t think it should mean all NA novels have to feature it either. Becoming and living as an adult is about much more than that, and I think people looking into the genre will appreciate quality stories with or without it. 


What is the "New Adult" genre? I keep seeing the name.

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NA fiction, or New Adult fiction, is a bridge genre that is targeted at (and features protagonists who are) people between 18-25. Sometimes the age range is pushed further, but that’s the general rule.

“The Transition from child to adult doesn’t happen overnight—just ask as anyone who is or has been (or is a parent to) a teenager. But the transition from teen to adult doesn’t happen overnight either. There’s a period of time where adulthood feels like a new pair of shoes. The expectations of independence and self-sufficiency are still new, still being broken in. New Adults are the people who have just begun to walk in those shoes; New Adult fiction is about their blisters and aches.” — Kristan Hoffman

So while Young Adult fiction focuses on that coming of age, when you first start to define who you are and establish yourself in the world, New Adult follows what happens after that. Generally, NA is still grouped into either Adult or YA, but it’s useful as a category on its own. 

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Got something you wanna know? Ask away


PUBLICATION OPPORTUNITY: Allegory E-zine 
"We’re looking for good, solid fiction. We specialize in the Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror genres. We will consider other genres, such as humor or general interest, provided that the work possesses an original, "quirky" slant in the Northern Exposure, Ally McBeal vein." [x]
Allegory publishes triannually, and their genre(s) are Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror. They’re looking for clever writing (with a twist), and they aren’t into gimmicky writing, gratuitous sex/violence, or pop culture pull ins. They pay a flat $15 for each piece, and they publish submissions for the next issue (meaning they don’t pre-pay.) Check out their submission guidelines here.
See more of The Writing Market: on the blog.

PUBLICATION OPPORTUNITY: Allegory E-zine 

"We’re looking for good, solid fiction. We specialize in the Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror genres. We will consider other genres, such as humor or general interest, provided that the work possesses an original, "quirky" slant in the Northern Exposure, Ally McBeal vein." [x]

Allegory publishes triannually, and their genre(s) are Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror. They’re looking for clever writing (with a twist), and they aren’t into gimmicky writing, gratuitous sex/violence, or pop culture pull ins. They pay a flat $15 for each piece, and they publish submissions for the next issue (meaning they don’t pre-pay.) Check out their submission guidelines here.

See more of The Writing Market: on the blog.