Friends and foes (and writer’s woes), we’re working on a few larger projects. One of them is really exciting, but we need to know who’d be interested. 

We want to put together an Anthology of Writing and Artwork. Meaning, we want to take the poems, stories, and comics that people send us and make them available in print and as an ebook. That way, we can give the new and young writers who ask us for advice what might be their first chance to get published — and they can share it (in whichever form) with whoever they want! 

The book would feature your writing and comics, mixed in with articles about writing skills and interviews with writers and creators we think you’ll appreciate. 

So here’s what we need to know: are our followers interested? We know you like contests, but do you want your short fiction or poem to be published by us and shared with other writers learning just like you? Tell us with a like (and a signal boost) or a message if you’re interested either in submitting to a CH anthology, or reading one. We want to know! 


What I often see in NA books, tho, is basically YA porn, or close to it. Do you think this category is helpful for a self-pubbed book that doesn’t have sex and isn’t about sex?

I think labels are what we make of them, and that the NA category (while maybe influenced by marketing) isn’t any different. While New Adult books will naturally have more sexual content overall than Young Adult, sexual content has been a staple of many coming of age novels for a long time.

That doesn’t mean all YA novels feature sex, so I don’t think it should mean all NA novels have to feature it either. Becoming and living as an adult is about much more than that, and I think people looking into the genre will appreciate quality stories with or without it. 


What is the "New Adult" genre? I keep seeing the name.

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NA fiction, or New Adult fiction, is a bridge genre that is targeted at (and features protagonists who are) people between 18-25. Sometimes the age range is pushed further, but that’s the general rule.

“The Transition from child to adult doesn’t happen overnight—just ask as anyone who is or has been (or is a parent to) a teenager. But the transition from teen to adult doesn’t happen overnight either. There’s a period of time where adulthood feels like a new pair of shoes. The expectations of independence and self-sufficiency are still new, still being broken in. New Adults are the people who have just begun to walk in those shoes; New Adult fiction is about their blisters and aches.” — Kristan Hoffman

So while Young Adult fiction focuses on that coming of age, when you first start to define who you are and establish yourself in the world, New Adult follows what happens after that. Generally, NA is still grouped into either Adult or YA, but it’s useful as a category on its own. 

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Got something you wanna know? Ask away


PUBLICATION OPPORTUNITY: Allegory E-zine 
"We’re looking for good, solid fiction. We specialize in the Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror genres. We will consider other genres, such as humor or general interest, provided that the work possesses an original, "quirky" slant in the Northern Exposure, Ally McBeal vein." [x]
Allegory publishes triannually, and their genre(s) are Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror. They’re looking for clever writing (with a twist), and they aren’t into gimmicky writing, gratuitous sex/violence, or pop culture pull ins. They pay a flat $15 for each piece, and they publish submissions for the next issue (meaning they don’t pre-pay.) Check out their submission guidelines here.
See more of The Writing Market: on the blog.

PUBLICATION OPPORTUNITY: Allegory E-zine 

"We’re looking for good, solid fiction. We specialize in the Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror genres. We will consider other genres, such as humor or general interest, provided that the work possesses an original, "quirky" slant in the Northern Exposure, Ally McBeal vein." [x]

Allegory publishes triannually, and their genre(s) are Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Horror. They’re looking for clever writing (with a twist), and they aren’t into gimmicky writing, gratuitous sex/violence, or pop culture pull ins. They pay a flat $15 for each piece, and they publish submissions for the next issue (meaning they don’t pre-pay.) Check out their submission guidelines here.

See more of The Writing Market: on the blog.


cocolooo:


James was a tall, thin man with untidy black hair that stuck up at the back. During his Hogwarts years, he had an indefinable air of having been well cared for and even adored. As late as his fifth year, he started wearing glasses, although in his first year he had not.
While at Hogwarts, James became the very best of friends with Sirius Black, Remus Lupin, and Peter Pettigrew, and the group called themselves “the Marauders”. The four friends enjoyed untold popularity while at school, and particularly liked playing pranks together.
Though more mischievous than diligent, James was a very clever student. At some point, he became Chaser for his house’s Quidditch team, and he was entirely aware of his talent. He was something of an obnoxious youth for the majority of his time at school; he liked to show off and was exceptionally self-confident. He habitually ruffled his hair to make it even untidier, to look as though he’d just got off his broomstick, according to Lily Evans.
By his seventh year, James had lost the less savoury aspects of his personality, and was even appointed Head Boy, despite the fact that he had not been a prefect.

yooo

cocolooo:

James was a tall, thin man with untidy black hair that stuck up at the back. During his Hogwarts years, he had an indefinable air of having been well cared for and even adored. As late as his fifth year, he started wearing glasses, although in his first year he had not.

While at Hogwarts, James became the very best of friends with Sirius Black, Remus Lupin, and Peter Pettigrew, and the group called themselves “the Marauders”. The four friends enjoyed untold popularity while at school, and particularly liked playing pranks together.

Though more mischievous than diligent, James was a very clever student. At some point, he became Chaser for his house’s Quidditch team, and he was entirely aware of his talent. He was something of an obnoxious youth for the majority of his time at school; he liked to show off and was exceptionally self-confident. He habitually ruffled his hair to make it even untidier, to look as though he’d just got off his broomstick, according to Lily Evans.

By his seventh year, James had lost the less savoury aspects of his personality, and was even appointed Head Boy, despite the fact that he had not been a prefect.

yooo


ihideinstories:

fictionwritingtips:

Trying to figure out what your style is isn’t as hard as it might seem. I’ve seen a lot of writers get asked questions like “how did you develop as a writer?” or “how did you find your style”, so I feel like this is a topic I should talk about. If you stop stressing out about it, it will all…

I don’t usually comment on stuff, but I’d like to respectfully disagree on one point. 

Mimicking the writing style of an author you admire can actually be very helpful. As a developing writer, you need to figure out whats best for you. If you write in the same style, and find you’re not suited for it, or you just don’t feel right, that’s good! Its helping you! I, personally, love writing in first person. It gives me a sense of personality, and in my perspective as a writer, I need that. But I only started using first person when I was mimicking the styles of Rick Riordan (did I just misspell his name? Please say no…). It helped me to focus on what I really liked to write. Sure, it sucked. When you write your really serious stuff, you should never actually try to imitate someone else. But using someone elses style for a while, trying on their clothes in a sense and seeing if they suit you is a great way to develop your voice. Today, I know that first person is basically almost always the way to go with my writing, and that humor is my friend. And if I hadn’t started out by copying someone else, I don’t think I would have learned that.

austinkleon's Steal Like An Artist should be required reading for writers, or anyone in a creative field. Mark Twain wrote once: “All Ideas are second hand.

And here’s a link from brain pickingsMark Twain on Plagiarism and Originality: “All Ideas Are Second-Hand”

It’s true. There’s no such thing as pure originality — inspiration comes from everything organic. If you’re watching movies, reading books, looking at artwork, you’re influencing your own art. As an artist, you steal from everything you love. You base your writing on the voices you want to hear on the page — whether you recognize it or not.