randomhouse:

chuckpalahniuk:

Chuck Palahniuk • Friday, July 25th • 4pm ET /1 pm PT
In celebration of Comic-Con, the announcement of Fight Club 2 and the fall novel, Beautiful You, we’re taking your questions right here on Tumblr.
Submit your questions via the Ask Box (here) and Chuck will answer them live from Comic-Con on Friday, July 25th at 4 pm ET/ 1pm PT. 
And, be sure to check out the new book, coming October 21st, 2014.

First rule of Tumblr club: you should definitely talk about chuckpalahniuk's Tumblr Q&A.

randomhouse:

chuckpalahniuk:

Chuck Palahniuk • Friday, July 25th • 4pm ET /1 pm PT

In celebration of Comic-Con, the announcement of Fight Club 2 and the fall novel, Beautiful You, we’re taking your questions right here on Tumblr.

Submit your questions via the Ask Box (here) and Chuck will answer them live from Comic-Con on Friday, July 25th at 4 pm ET/ 1pm PT.

And, be sure to check out the new book, coming October 21st, 2014.

First rule of Tumblr club: you should definitely talk about chuckpalahniuk's Tumblr Q&A.


cyrilvamp asked: Just so you know you're a flawless creature and I love you and all of your artwork. I've just dropped out of art school, it really took all of my passion out of me. Do you have any suggestions as to how I can get my groove back?

littlefroggies:

My advice for losing passion or drive is kinda different than most my friends so take that with a grain of salt, but I can only say what’s worked for me: Make yourself work. Doesn’t matter what you’re working on, don’t let yourself sit around not doing anything. You don’t have to take on, like, your opus or anything… but you need to be doing something with your art. You need to make a project, and hold yourself accountable for finishing it. Even if it looks like trash or its a failed experiment, its okay to make bad stuff. You learn from making bad stuff. Just keep your hands busy, keep your brain busy.

If I waited for when I felt my “groove” or had passion for it, I’d probably be out of a job because there was a 3 month period not long ago when I was burnt out and tired of drawing/writing, but I had to cuz its my job. I did good work I was proud of, regardless of being in my groove. I just had to find a motivation that wasn’t passion for those 3 months… which turned out to be “fear of not getting paid” and “refusing to drop quality.”

I am not of the opinion people should only work when they feel inspired. Sometimes, you just have to do it. You have to sit down and work. You have to find a reason to keep going at it during the times when the passion isn’t there, cuz the passion will not always be there.

like I said, take my advise with a grain of salt. This is what’s worked for me and how I function.


PUBLICATION OPPORTUNITY: Glimmer Train 
“Susan and Linda started Glimmer Train in 1990 to publish great literary fiction by established and emerging short-story writers. We have, from the beginning, paid our contributors with real dollars as well as with copies. In a year’s time we pay writers over $50,000, nearly a third of that going to new writers.”

Glimmer Train is one of my favorite literary magazines, mostly because they’re focused on the welfare of their writers. Run by two sisters, GT is one of the kindest website experiences for the up and coming writer looking for submission opportunities I’ve ever visited. Their payment is more than generous, and they’re committed to publishing new voices. 
Pays on acceptance, and publishes an average of 15 months past that (according to the 2014 Writer’s Market). Simultaneously submissions are OK, and editors respond around two months after submission. Their genre is literary fiction, and they have five submission categories, including regular magazine submissions and type contests.
[[MORE]]
The standard category has no reading fees and payment for accepted pieces is $700, and the four contests have reading fees that allow for 1st place prizes is in the thousands. 
CURRENT: Very Short Fiction (1st place - $1,500): Welcome in January, April, July, and October.
UPCOMING: Short Story Award for New Writers (1st place - $1,500): Welcome in February, May, August, November.
Fiction Open (1st place - $2,500): Welcome in June and December (closes January 2).
Family Matters (1st place - $1,500): Welcome in March and September.
Standard Category ($700): Welcome in January, May, September.

PUBLICATION OPPORTUNITY: Glimmer Train 

Susan and Linda started Glimmer Train in 1990 to publish great literary fiction by established and emerging short-story writers. We have, from the beginning, paid our contributors with real dollars as well as with copies. In a year’s time we pay writers over $50,000, nearly a third of that going to new writers.”

image

Glimmer Train is one of my favorite literary magazines, mostly because they’re focused on the welfare of their writers. Run by two sisters, GT is one of the kindest website experiences for the up and coming writer looking for submission opportunities I’ve ever visited. Their payment is more than generous, and they’re committed to publishing new voices. 

Pays on acceptance, and publishes an average of 15 months past that (according to the 2014 Writer’s Market). Simultaneously submissions are OK, and editors respond around two months after submission. Their genre is literary fiction, and they have five submission categories, including regular magazine submissions and type contests.

Read More


"You have a masterpiece inside you, you know. One unlike any that has ever been created, or ever will be. If you go to your grave without painting your masterpiece, it will not get painted. No one else can paint it. Only you."
Orbiting the Giant Hairball, by Gordon Mackenzie

"Perhaps all the dragons in our lives are princesses who are only waiting to see us act, just once, with beauty and courage. Perhaps everything that frightens us is, in its deepest essence, something helpless that wants our love."
Letters to a Young Poet, by Rainer Maria Rilke

llanval:

vangoghsdaughter:

quidditching:

Let me bring you a thing back

  • blond= male
  • blonde=female
  • brunet=male or female
  • brunette=female
  • fiancé=male
  • fiancée=female

Good day.

I did not know this.

things that should be taught in english lessons but aren’t.

welcome to the basics of stealing from French

This is a very useful breakdown, but no word of a lie, I don’t care. I will use the gender specific engagement titles if the situation merits their use, and only if I absolutely must. I will not and do not use gendered hair colour terms. Sorry everyone. If ya blonde, ya blonde. I don’t care if you are a lady, a dude or any variation of said theme, I like the e at the end.

CH stands with Llanval (author of the fic Eidolon, one of the best fanworks we’ve ever read), here. Blonde does look nicer, and ‘brunet’ in an English setting just looks like a misspell. You want your english, when writing for english speakers, to be more accessible. Not less. 

It should be said that, in general, when used as an adjective people most often spell blond without the e. But it’s not a hard and fast rule, and it hardly matters. If you red penned someone’s terminal e you’d be being a jerk. 

Gender endings on most words get discarded when we bring them into English, and I think that’s a good thing. Preserving the french history of the words is a fun concept (the same for adopted italian and spanish words), but there’s something significant to be said for preserving English as a language without a gender system. The only time gender comes into play in typical english is through personal pronouns - the exceptions are reactive descriptive nouns like “actress” or “widower,” and even those are going out of style fast.

So trying to enforce or encourage a gender system in English wording is a bit nonsensical and more like a step backward in the language’s development than anything else. Food for thought!